8 Mile Circular Walk Through The Cornish Mining World Heritage Site Including Carn Brea, Carn Marth And Gwennap Pit

Carn Brea, Carn Marth and Gwennap Pit are the highlights of this brilliant walk in Cornwall’s mining heartland on the outskirts of Redruth. What makes it so brilliant you ask? Apart from the sense of history and the rough and ready landscape, it’s all about the views from the tops of two prominent hills: Carn Brea and Carn Marth.

You'll see countless remains of tin mines, an 18thC hunting lodge, two amphitheatres and spectacular 360° views from coast to coast.

Well worth putting on your walking shoes for!

Cornwall’s Historic Industrial Heartland

Carn Brea, Carn Marth And Gwennap Pit

View of Carn Brea from Carn Marth, copyright Stephanie Boon, Cornwall UK, 2018. All rights reserved.

Carn Brea Hill, Castle And Monument

Discover Cornwall’s historic industrial heartland on this circular walk; it’s great for blowing away the cobwebs, especially in elemental weather!

My route heads southwest of Redruth up the prominent hill of Carn Brea, which is a distinctive landmark on the horizon that can be seen for miles around. There’s archaeological evidence of Neolithic enclosures as well as the 27 metre high Basset monument (1863) and Carn Brea Castle (an old hunting lodge built by the Basset family in the 18thC on the remains of a 14C chapel) to explore.

From Carn Brea To Carn Marth Hill And Amphitheatre

From Carn Brea the walk heads across to Carn Marth hill along old mining trails where you’ll see the remains of intensive tin mining, from chimneys to beam engine houses.

Heading up Carn Marth is an amphitheatre built into the hollow of an old quarry and at the top are two flooded quarries that create large natural ponds, and of course spectacular views as far as Falmouth Bay on the south coast. Make your way around to the trig point and you’ll see Portreath on the north coast and an impressive view of Carn Brea (the photo above).

From Carn Marth To Gwennap Pit

You then head down hill and along narrow country lanes, between Cornish hedges filled with wild flowers, to Gwennap Pit. Gwennap Pit is another amphitheatre built into a natural dip, thought to be caused by mine workings below, and is renowned as the place where John Wesley, the founder of Methodism, preached to miners and their families in the 18thC. The route then heads back across fields to Redruth.

Follow the Summary tab above for details of the route and the links below to help you plan your walk.

Hand drawn route map - Redruth. Copyright Stephanie Boon, 2018. All Rights Reserved.

All About The Route

  • Start and Finish: Redruth Railway Station SW 700 420
  • Distance: 8 miles  •  Difficulty: Easy  •  Time: Half Day
  • Facilities: Full town facilities in Redruth (see below), restaurant at Carn Brea Castle (bookings only)
  • Terrain: Mostly off road on footpaths, tracks (some rocky) and quiet country lanes. Several main roads to cross including the B3300 and the A393.
  • Points of Interest: Carn Brea hill, Castle and monument, The Great Flat Lode mining trail, Carn Marth hill and amphitheatre, plus Gwennap Pit amphitheatre.

It can be extremely windy on top of the hills at all times of year – I recommend packing a windproof top even in summer!

Plan Your Walk

Map and Roamer - plan a route. Copyright Stephanie Boon, 2018. All Rights Reserved

The Route

GPX file

Compass pointing north on a map. Copyright Stephanie Boon, 2018. All Rights Reserved

The Map

OS Explorer 104*

1:2500 Redruth and St Agnes
Start/Finish SW 700 420

Circular image of Carn Brea Castle, Redruth.

In Redruth

Railway • BusesCar Parks

Shops and Banks • Tourist Information

Public toilets in New Cut Car Park

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